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Oxford

Oxford is a city in the South East region of England, situated 57 miles (92 km) from London. This city is famous all over the world for its University and the place in history.

The University of Oxford is one of the leading universities in the world and the oldest university in the English – speaking world and also one of the most famous and prestigious higher education institutions of the world.

Buildings in Oxford demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. The city is relatively small. Oxford city has many shops, several theatres and an ice rink. The historic buildings make this location a popular target for film and TV crews.

Oxford is home to many museums, galleries and collections. The first of those was the Ashmolean Museum, the world’s first-university museum, and the oldest museum in the UK. It hold significant collections of art and archaeology, including works by Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Turner and Picasso.

Another attraction worth seeing is Hertford Bridge often called the Bridge of Sighs because of the similarity to the famous bridge in Venice. This bridge is a skyway joining two parts of Hertford College over New College Lane in Oxford.

Church of St. Mary the Virgin is the largest of Oxford’s parish churches and the centre from which University of Oxford grew. From The Tower you can see some of the finest views of Oxford’s famous skyline. It’s worth the climb of 124 steps to make it to the top to enjoy fine uninterrupted views in all directions across Oxford and the surrounding countryside.

In Oxford there is also a working library – The Bodleian Library. The Bodleian was opened in 1602 by Thomas Bodley with a collection of 2000 books. In 1610, Bodley made an agreement with Stationers’ Company in London to put a copy of every book registered with them in the library (nowadays, each book copyrighted must be deposited). Today, there are 9 million items on 176 kilometres of shelving and the library can accommodate 2500 readers. Books may not be taken off the premises. Built in 1749 to house the Radcliffe Science Library, the Radcliffe Camera (camera is another word for “room”) is now a reading room for the Bodleian Library. The distinctive circular dome and drum of the structure makes it one of the most recognizable and often photographed building in Oxford. This building is not open to the public.

The next famous place is The Sheldonian Theatre which was built in 1664, situated in Oxford’s city centre. It is the official ceremonial hall of the University of Oxford. It is used for music concerts, lectures and University ceremonies including matriculation, graduation ceremonies, Encaenia and Congregation. The Theatre is open to the public to visit when not in use.

The Oxford University Press (OUP) publishes many reference, professional, and academic works, including the Oxford English Dictionary. The OUP grew to the world's largest press after receiving rights to publish the King James Version of the Bible. Today, it publishes more than 4,500 new books each year In Oxford there is The Oxford University Press (OUP) which publishes many reference, professional, and academic works, including the Oxford English Dictionary.

The OUP grew to the world's largest press after receiving rights to publish the King James Version of the Bible. Today, it publishes more than 4,500 new books each year Blackwell’s Bookstore (48-51 Broad Street) it’s not just a regular bookstore. It has the largest single room devoted to book sales in all of Europe.

Oxford is a very green city, with several parks, gardens and nature walks. Botanic Gardens is located on the peaceful banks of the Cherwell River, the gardens were started in 1621 as the Physic Gardens, for the study of medicinal plants. These are the oldest botanic gardens in Britain. In addition to the lovely outdoor gardens, there are greenhouses which grow many varieties of exotic plants and flowers.

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